We remain open to provide care for your pets. We are following the direction of government and regulatory authorities and have implemented hospital and visit protocols to keep both you and our team safe. For regular updates on our hours and visit protocols, please follow our social media platforms.

613.394.4811

When to Call

It can be difficult to know when your pet is having an emergency, here is an outline of how to judge the situation.

Call Immediately:

Seizures

  • How long are the seizures?
  • How many has the pet had?
  • Have a description – loss of bladder or bowels, full body tremors or localized, etc.
  • Has the pet gotten into anything?

Toxic ingestion

  • How much did the pet eat?
  • When did they eat it?
  • How much did they eat?
  • Any symptoms so far?
  • Bring the container to the veterinarian with you

Wounds/trauma

  • How did it happen?
  • When did it happen?
  • Try not to move the pet too much
  • Use a piece of rope as a muzzle – your pet may bite out pain and fear
  • Place a bandage if necessary

Collapse

  • What was the pet doing when they collapsed?
  • What colour are the gums?
  • Any history of heart disease or respiratory disease?

Difficulty breathing

  • Any coughing?
  • Any history of heart disease?
  • What colour are the gums?

Paralysis

  • Did it happen suddenly or were there any signs of lameness or wobbliness first?
  • Any history of trauma?
  • Are they able to stand or walk?

Not passing urine/straining to urinate

  • When did the pet last pass a full volume of urine?
  • Are they passing any urine at all?
  • What is their current diet?
  • Any history of urinary issues?
  • Is any blood seen in the urine?

Distended/bloated abdomen

  • When was it first noted?
  • Any history of trauma, liver disease or heart disease?
  • Any history of collapse?

Facial swelling

  • Was your pet bitten/stung by an insect?
  • When was the swelling first noted?
  • Any difficulty breathing?
  • What colour are the gums?
  • Any current medications or supplements?

Difficulty giving birth

  • There should be a puppy or kitten born within 30 minutes of strong regular contractions, and there should be no more than 2 hours between puppies/kittens
  • When was the due date?
  • Has an x-ray been taken to see how many puppies/kittens are expected?
  • What breed is the father?
  • How many previous litters has she had?

Call in 24 Hours:

Blood in urine – but not straining

  • Any difficulty passing urine?
  • What volume of urine is the pet passing?
  • What diet is the pet eating?
  • Any current supplements or medications?
  • How frequently is the pet urinating/attempting to urinate?

Vomiting

  • What does the vomit look like? Any blood?
  • Any diarrhea?
  • Has the pet gotten into anything recently?
  • Does the pet tend to eat toys or other objects?
  • Are they able to keep water down?
  • Do they want to eat?

Not drinking

  • Are they still eating?
  • Any weight loss?
  • Are they producing urine and feces?
  • Have they gotten into anything?
  • Any vomiting or diarrhea?

Red, runny eyes, squinting, rubbing eyes

  • What does the discharge look like?
  • Any sneezing or nasal discharge?
  • Any history or trauma?

Lameness – not weight bearing

  • Any history of trauma?
  • Which leg is it?
  • Is it always the same leg?
  • Have any ticks ever been found on this pet or any other people or pets in the house?
  • Any previous history of lameness?
  • Any current medications or supplements?

Coughing?

  • What colour are the gums?
  • How often is the pet coughing?
  • Is the cough keeping them up at night?
  • Any travel or boarding history?
  • Any history of heart disease?
  • What does the cough sound like?
  • Is the pet coughing anything up?

Vaginal discharge

  • When did it start?
  • Is she spayed?
  • Any change in her appetite, drinking, urination?

Call Next Business Day:

Red, sore, dirty, smelly ears

  • Has the pet had any ear infections in the past?
  • Any current medications or supplements?
  • What diet is the pet currently eating?
  • Is the pet itchy anywhere else (e.g. feet)?
  • Has the pet been to the groomer, swimming or snowdiving?

Diarrhea of the pet is still eating and drinking

  • How often is the pet passing BM?
  • Any blood or mucus in the stools?
  • How long have they had diarrhea?
  • Have they gotten into anything?
  • Is the pet still eating and drinking?

Not eating or eating less

  • Are they still drinking?
  • Are they refusing treats as well?
  • Any weight loss?
  • Any change in the amount of urine produced?
  • Any vomiting or diarrhea?
  • What is the current diet?
  • Any change in the diet?

Weight loss

  • How long have they been losing weight?
  • Are they still eating and drinking?
  • Any change in the amount they are drinking or urinating?
  • Any vomiting or diarrhea?
  • What is the current diet?

Lameness – weight bearing

  • Any history of trauma?
  • Which leg is it?
  • Is it always the same leg?
  • Have any ticks ever been found on this pet or any other people or pets in the house?
  • Any previous history of lameness?
  • Any current medications or supplements?

Bad breath

  • What is the current diet?
  • What do they chew on?
  • Any vomiting or diarrhea?
  • Are they still eating or drinking?
  • Any difficulty picking up the food, chewing or swallowing it?
  • Any blood noted on their chew toys?
  • Any change in how much they are drinking or urinating?

Tumour/Swelling

  • When did you first notice it?
  • Has it changed in size?
  • Is the pet scratching it?
  • Is it painful to touch?
  • Any discharge noted from it?
  • Is there more than one?

Not passing feces/Constipation

  • Any urine produced?
  • Are they still eating and drinking?
  • Are they straining?
  • Are any stools being passed? What did they look like?
  • When was the last bowel movement?

Written by Hillcrest Animal Hospital

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Last updated: May 29, 2020

Dear Clients,

With recent changes to restrictions on businesses, we are pleased to advise that effective May 19, 2020 the restrictions on veterinary practices have been lifted. Based on these changes, below are some important updates to our operating policies.

1. WE CAN NOW SEE ALL CASES BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

This includes vaccines, wellness exams, blood work, heartworm testing, spays and neuters, dental services, and more!

2. SAFETY MEASURES TO KEEP EVERYONE SAFE

3. ONLINE CONSULTATIONS ARE AVAILABLE

If you wish to connect with a veterinarian via message, phone or video, visit our website and follow the "Online Consultation" link.

4. OPERATING HOURS

We are OPEN with the following hours:

Monday to Friday 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Saturday & Sunday: Closed

Thank you for your patience and understanding and we look forward to seeing you and your furry family members again!

- Your dedicated team at Hillcrest Animal Hospital